Event Category: Exhibition

HOME: BODY

A close-up of artist, Cindy Baker, laying on her stomach on a small circular mattress on the floor of a glass-walled gallery.

Please join Tangled as we present our final exhibition of 2017, between December 7 – 16. Home: Body is a series of live performances featuring Jessica Leung [Vancouver, BC], Jenelle Rouse [London, ON], and Cindy Baker [Edmonton/Lethbridge AB], who are shaping space and place through the body in distinctive ways.

There are several different performances with the artists, beginning with the opening on Thursday, December 7, 2017.

Each event has its own link to RSVP. Due to the size of the gallery and access requirements, all interested in attending need to register. If you have any questions, please call or email Kristina: 647-725-5046 or kristina@tangledarts.org.

Thursday, December 7 Opening event: 6pm – 8pm
Featured for this opening to Home : Body, Deaf emerging artist Jessica Leung will present a selection from their poetry. To RSVP for this event – https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/home-body-opening-reception-tickets-40154371807

Friday, December 8 Performance: 7pm – 9pm
Emerging artist Jessica Leung and dance artist Jenelle Rouse perform new selections from poetry and original dance work reflecting their experiences as Deaf people of colour. Themes of intersectionality and navigating a hearing-centric society inform the individual performances. To RSVP for this performance – https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/home-body-december-8-performance-tickets-40154532287

Saturday, December 9 Live Described Performance: 7pm – 9pm
This is the second night that Jessica and Jenelle will present their individual performances. Live Description and ASL interpretation will be integrated. To RSVP for this Live Described performance – https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/home-body-december-9-live-described-performance-tickets-40154603500

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Tangled partners with FADO Performance Art Centre to present Performance Artist Cindy Baker

Thursday, December 14 & Friday, December 15 Performances: 1 – 4pm
Cindy Baker will present a new iteration of her noted “Crash Pad” within the confines of the gallery space. Crash Pad centralizes the artist’s “failing,” disabled, or otherwise socially taboo body. No RSVP is needed to attend these afternoon performances.

Saturday, December 16 Live Described Performance: 7 – 9pm
For this evening performance of Cindy Baker’s “Crash Pad” Live Description will be integrated. Dialog with the artist follows.
To RSVP for this performance – https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/home-body-december-16-performance-tickets-40154764983

ALSO
at The Commons on the 4th floor of 401 Richmond Street West Building —

Saturday, December 16 Performance: Academy: 2 – 4pm
For this unique public engagement. Cindy Baker will offer an “academy” that invites all who attend an opportunity to participate.
This engagement is hosted by FADO Performance Arts. To RSVP – https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/december-16-public-engagement-fado-performance-academy-with-cindy-baker-tickets-40154691764

Tangled Art Gallery is barrier-free and service animals are welcome. ASL interpretation and attendant care will be provided. We ask for everyone to support a scent-free environment. The closest accessible subway station is Union Station, the closest accessible streetcar stops are the 510 Spadina Queen Street stop southbound and, Richmond Street stop going northbound.

[Image Description: A photograph that is of a close-up of the artist, Cindy Baker, laying on her stomach on a small circular mattress on the floor of a glass-walled gallery. Her face is pointed towards the camera, eyes closed and she is embracing a blue and white mattress cover. ]

Salt of the Earth Opening Artist Talk

A photograph of a clay pot on a white window sill.

Please join us for an intimate artist talk with Bishara Elmi, whose new installation – Salt of the Earth – is the next exhibition to open at Tangled! If you are interested in attending this opening event, please RSVP using our Eventbrite page, linked here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/salt-of-the-earth-opening-artist-talk-tickets-38854530948

This talk will be held within the gallery and due to limited capacity and access, we are requesting that all interested in attending RSVP.

Exhibition dates: October 26 – November 25, 2017
Opening Artist Talk: October 26, 6:00-8:00 pm
Media Preview: October 26, 3:00-5:00 pm
Second Saturday Social: November 11, 1:00-4:00 pm
Location: Tangled Art Gallery S-122, 401 Richmond St W, Toronto, ON

Dirt is the central material that multidisciplinary artist Bishara Elmi works with in Salt of the Earth; signifying how this element is loaded with multiple meanings and legacies that span across continents to the artist’s homeland in Somalia. This new installation is comprised of crafted domestic objects made from earth that enact a “home” space. These dirt sculptures which Elmi labours over in the making of the work could fall apart at any moment within the installation, and the sense of stability that comes with home could cease to exist.

About The Artist:
Bishara Elmi is a multidisciplinary artist, writer, educator, and public speaker working in visual forms and with numerous materials and creative processes, currently residing in Toronto by way of Mogadishu. Elmi also works individually and within collectives centering BIPOC youth, women and femmes voices and stories and has created many spaces for these types of storytelling and skill sharing to take place.

Tangled Art Gallery is Canada’s first fully accessible disability arts gallery dedicated to advancing accessible programming and curatorial practices. Tangled Art Gallery is proud to be barrier-free, cost-free, and open to the public. All events include ASL Interpretation, Attendant Care, and trained sighted guides. Service animals are welcome. We ask that you help us make our events scent free.

Second Saturday Social with sab meynart

Gallery view of artist sab's artwork on walls and objects in the center. sab meynart and artistic director Barak adé Soleil talk to eachother in the space.

Second Saturday Socials are part of the public programming of Tangled Art Gallery’s Series: Space Shapes Place. October’s Second Saturday Social will take place in tangent with sab meynert’s exhibition, Progress is a Spiral Upwards, and will include a guided live description tour of the exhibition, a dialog between the artist and Tangled Art Gallery’s Artistic Director, Barak adé Soleil, as well snacks and beverages.

The live description tour will begin at 2:00pm, followed by a dialog with the artist.

Space for this event is limited and is available on a first come first serve basis.Please RSVP to this event on our eventbrite event listing here: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/second-saturday-socials-tickets-38543801548

Progress is a Spiral Upward by sab meynert

A photograph of a piece of artwork. The artwork features white and black figures and visual elements on a dark brown, metallic background.

Progress is a Spiral Upward, a visual arts exhibit by Toronto-based artist sab meynert, consists of vivid drawings and sculptural pieces. meynert utilizes organic repetitive patterning, interweaving poetic imagery and text to reveal graphic maps reflecting life’s infinitely unfolding nature. For this premiere exhibit, meynert will show new pieces that incorporate semi-precious crystal, alabaster stone, 24k gold and silver, and organic matter, in addition to handcrafted ink and paint paper works. These new elements call upon their traditional knowledge, rooted in ways that intentionally draw out the metaphysical abilities of material, and move the work beyond the limits of form.

That’s So Gay

A view of children playing in the water on a beach with the words "That's so gay, uprising. June 14-August 17.

Join us for the Gladstone Hotel’s 8th Annual TSG exhibition; a group show celebrating new works by LGBTTI2QQ artists curated by Syrus Marcus Ware.

TSG: Uprising considers the ways that we mount (small scale/daily and large-scale global) uprisings through collaborative change making across the globe to fight for our self determination as queer and trans people with multitude interlocking experiences of marginalization- thinking about migration, disability, sexuality, gender and race and their intersections.

Uprising, refers to many things, descriptive of the kinds of massive protests, civic engagement and wide-spread calls for systemic change that we have witnessed across North America. Some of the most pressing of these calls to action have come from within the Toronto queer and trans communities.

The last year has witnessed dramatic arts-based displays of activism within Toronto’s Pride Parade by Black Lives Matter-TO, widespread support for INAC shut downs by Indigenous youth and ongoing actions in support of land defence and water protection.

Indeed, 2017 is a time for reflecting on these fires of change, burning bright and largely nurtured by LGBTTI2QQ and two-spirited activists and artists. We have witnessed unprecedented coverage of cross-movement building amongst Indigenous, Black and POC Two-Spirited and LGBTTI2QQ communities, collective struggle and the need to unify and call for creative responses to transphobic and homophobic violence that is dis-proportionally affecting Indigenous and racialized trans women. TSG: Uprising highlights the need for artistic engagement and responses to propel our activisms into a new dimension.

We have seen such a thrust towards right-wing conservatism across North America over the past five years, and in particular since the US election in November 2016. This conservatism threatens particularly vulnerable queer and trans community members across both the US and Canada, limiting our abilities to move and be in public space (proposed travel bans, limited border crossings, inability to access public washrooms for trans people, cuts to disability supports and the list goes on).

This neoliberal turn threatens artistic sustainability, freedom of speech and the survival of human on this planet. Now more than ever we need the to engage with arts-based activisms, artistic considerations of social issues and arts-informed problem solving.

TSG: Uprising offers an opportunity to imagine new ways of being together, of working together and of shaping the world together. The artists in this year’s show root their practices in social justice and liberation theory and offers us a way forward through to a world where we all get to be free.

Featuring artists: Raven Davis, Anique Jordan (Jashoba Jordan), Melisse Watson, Lynx Sainte-Marie+ Ciel Sainte-Marie, Andrew Mcphail, Mikiki Burino, Lindsay Fisher, Amber Williams-King, Vanessa Kwan, and Patchwork Mckenzie Rodney Diverlus Ella Cooper

See you at our OPENING PARTY on all 4 floors of the Gladstone Hotel’s exhibition galleries on June 22nd 7-10pm, in conjunction with 10×10 PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT (curated by James Fowler) and Pride Month in Toronto.

Join us on July 27th for the TSG Artist Pecha Kucha 7-9pm

Join us after the Opening in the Gladstone Melody Bar for after-party drinks, eats and fabulous beats by DJ Ace Dillinger!

ACCESS INFO: The Gladstone Hotel is located at the corner of Queen and Gladstone. The closest subway is Dufferin Station.

There is an access ramp at the front entrance and accessible washrooms throughout the hotel. There is an antique hand operated elevator that can fit about 4 people standing and 1 person seated with the lift operator.

Remarks will be in English, we are working to secure ASL interpretation at the moment.

Crip Interiors: MIXER

A rectangular collage image with five small photos, with three in the top row and two in the bottom row. Each photo depicts an artwork, portrait or performance by one of the core artists in MIXER.

“MIXER is about deepening community, discovering new ways of working together, experiencing multi-layered artistry and affirming intersectional identities.”

Creative Users is launching our 3rd edition of Crip Interiors titled MIXER, curated by award-winning artists Syrus Marcus Ware and Barak adé Soleil and hosted this year by Tangled Art + Disability at Tangled Art Gallery in 401 Richmond Street West building, Suite 122.

Crip Interiors is a provocative demonstration of disability art and activism that brings together distinct creative perspectives and mediums into a shared space. The work presented in Crip Interiors exposes that which is often hidden, revealing the daily labour, creativity, and love that goes into negotiating public and private spaces often built and organized without disabled bodies in mind.

Collaboration, process and explorations of disability justice will be central to the collective work of MIXER. In July, a core of disability-identified artists from Black, Indigenous and people of colour communities will participate in a 5-week open studio period designed and co-facilitated by Syrus Marcus Ware and Barak adé Soleil. The artists will engage in an immersive creation process and develop new collaborative installation work that will be exhibited for three days, August 10th-12th. Exploring the intimacy of collaborative process, the artists of colour within the Deaf, Mad, disability communities, and of varied disciplines will creatively engage with each other in ways that are experimental and expansive. MIXER is about deepening community, discovering new ways of working together, experiencing multi-layered artistry and affirming intersectional identities. Public programming will include artist dialogs, open studio moments and showing of the artists’ communal process through a three-day exhibition.


MIXER focuses on new collaborations and creative process, with participating artists: Kanika Gupta, Anique Jordan, Wy Joung Kou, Najla Nubyanluv and Melisse Watson.

 

About the curators:

 

A black and white photograph of a black man in side profile. His hand is holding the side of his face, and his eyes are looking downwards. The man is wearing a dark sweater and a newsboy cap. He appears to be in deep thought.

A black and white photograph of a black man in side profile. His hand is holding the side of his face, and his eyes are looking downwards. The man is wearing a dark sweater and a newsboy cap. He appears to be in deep thought.

Barak adé Soleil

Barak adé Soleil has been part of the international contemporary arts scene for 25 years. Currently Barak is the Artistic Director of Tangled Art + Disability and making performance work focused on the intersection and intertwining legacies of race and disability.

 

 

 


 

A black and white photo of Syrus, a black trans man, sitting sideways in a wicker chair, with his back leaning against the wall behind the chair. He is smiling and is looking for towards his left side. He has long black dreadlocks, and is playing with some of them in his hand.

A black and white photo of Syrus, a black trans man, sitting sideways in a wicker chair, with his back leaning against the wall behind the chair. He is smiling and is looking for towards his left side. He has long black dreadlocks, and is playing with some of them in his hand.

Syrus Marcus Ware

Syrus Marcus Ware is a Vanier Scholar, a visual artist, community activist, researcher, youth-advocate, educator, and core-team member of Black Lives Matter Toronto. As a visual artist, Syrus works within the mediums of painting, installation and performance to challenge systemic oppression. Syrus’ work explores the spaces between and around identities; acting as provocations to our understandings of gender, sexuality and race.

 

 

 


 

About the artists:

 

A Black and White image of a Black woman sitting cross legged, the frame of the photo cuts off the right side of her body. On the left side of the fraim her shadow is cast. Anique wears a piece of patterned cloth wrapped loosely around her head and shoulders and a t-shirt that reads “stolen from Africa”.

A Black and White image of a Black woman sitting cross legged, the frame of the photo cuts off the right side of her body. On the left side of the fraim her shadow is cast. Anique wears a piece of patterned cloth wrapped loosely around her head and shoulders and a t-shirt that reads “stolen from Africa”.

Anique Jordan

Anique Jordan is a multi-disciplinary artist, award-winning writer, scholar and social-entrepreneur. As an artist, her artwork plays with the aesthetics found in traditional Trinidadian carnival and the theory of hauntology challenging historical narratives and creating, what she calls, impossible images. Her art creation processes are guided by the questions: What stories do we tell that go unchallenged? And in how many ways can we know a thing? Anique’s work has taken her to Jamaica, Costa Rica, South Africa, Ecuador, Trinidad and Barbados exploring the connections between art and socio-economic survival. Anique has performed and exhibited in galleries across Canada including Art Gallery of Windsor (2017), Eastern Edge Gallery (2016), Art Gallery of Ontario (2016), Nuit Blanche (2016), Gallery 44 (2016), Crossroads Artspace (2015) and The Watah Gallery (2015). She is currently the executive director of Whippersnapper Gallery, part of the curatorial team at the Art Gallery of Ontario and working on the manuscript for her first book, Possessed: Black Women, Hauntology and Art as Survival. @aniquejordan, aniquejjordan.com


 

Pictured in this photo is mixed race east-asian femme person with facial piercings and the sides of their head shaved, sitting upright on a cement ledge with their legs crossed and hands resting on their knee. They have a neutral facial expression and are looking into the camera wearing bright red lipstick, winged eyeliner, large circular earrings, prayer beads around their wrist, a black blazer with gold detailing, fitted black pants and black nail polish. Behind them is a garage door and brick wall full of colourful graffiti.

Pictured in this photo is mixed race east-asian femme person with facial piercings and the sides of their head shaved, sitting upright on a cement ledge with their legs crossed and hands resting on their knee. They have a neutral facial expression and are looking into the camera wearing bright red lipstick, winged eyeliner, large circular earrings, prayer beads around their wrist, a black blazer with gold detailing, fitted black pants and black nail polish. Behind them is a garage door and brick wall full of colourful graffiti.

Wy Joung Kou

Wy Joung Kou is an emerging queer multi-disciplinary artist based in Toronto. Their practice includes work in mosaic, installation, community-based art, performance, poetry and disability art. They have been self-employed as a queer community barber for 4 years and have been producing permanent public artwork with Red Dress Productions with communities in St James Town, Winchester Park and Etobicoke since 2015. They have received over 2 years of mentorship in ceramic and glass mosaic production and community art facilitation. Kou has presented disability focused artwork in group exhibitions such as Project Creative Users’ CRIP INTERIORS shows as well as with Alliedoscope Collective and Storywave Collective.

In 2014 Kou was chosen to participate in the Asian Arts Freedom School’s Drag Musical Mentorship Program and has since performed in Les Femmes Fatales: Women & Femmes of Colour Burlesque Troupe’s rotating cast as a burlesque performer. They have performed at community shows and events such as Unapologetic Burlesque, PinkdotTO and the LGBT Youth Awards Gala. Kou was recently awarded the Ontario Art Council’s Access and Career Development Grant to continue to pursue work and mentorship with Red Dress Productions as they took part in the production and mounting of Drift Seeds, a large community theater production presented in Winchester Park in June 2017. They seek to cultivate a disability arts practice that centers accessibility while exploring themes of grief, resilience, chronic illness and healing.


 

A Black woman is in the middle ground of the frame. Behind her is sweeping bright red fabric. The foreground is a brown object that her arm is resting on. Her hand is resting on her cheek with her fingers folded over at a right angle. Her eyes are looking to the right.

A Black woman is in the middle ground of the frame. Behind her is sweeping bright red fabric. The foreground is a brown object that her arm is resting on. Her hand is resting on her cheek with her fingers folded over at a right angle. Her eyes are looking to the right.

Najla Nubyanluv

Graduate of The Watah Theatre School & alumni of bCurrent’s mandiela rAiz’n in the Sun ensemble, Najla Nubyanluv is a queer black playwright, actor, author, doula & Residency Coordinator at The Watah Theatre. During her recent Sorplusi Arts Fellowship at Watah, Nubyanluv’s afrofuturist play I Cannot Lose My Mind received Individual Creation funding from Canada Council for the Arts. She is also the author & illustrator of I Love Being Black, a children’s book published by Sorplusi Press. Look out for the world premiere of I Cannot Lose My Mind in Watah’s upcoming 2017/18 Season of Nomads.


 

A Woman sits at a desk with a pencil/pen in her hand poised over a piece of paper. She wears a white shirt and red paints. Her long Dark hair falls onto her shoulders. She is laughing and looking into the distance outside the frame to the left, she is laughing.

A Woman sits at a desk with a pencil/pen in her hand poised over a piece of paper. She wears a white shirt and red paints. Her long Dark hair falls onto her shoulders. She is laughing and looking into the distance outside the frame to the left, she is laughing.

Kanika Gupta

Kanika is an artist, writer and social entrepreneur who actively influences change by leading by example. Her visual artistic practice is diverse ranging from stick figure doodles to sculpture, painting to photography. Through all of her creative and community building endeavours, Kanika seeks to contribute towards creating new societal norms that are more inclusive and accurately embody what it means to be human.  Art entered and opened up Kanika’s world in 2013.  Kanika has participated in The Brain Project, a commissioned outdoor Public Art Installation and has exhibited her work in public galleries in Toronto, Canada.

www.bykanika.com
@bykanika


 

Melisse stands in front of a white wall with their arms crossed holding their elbow and arm. Their body casts a light shadow behind them, and overlaps with the shadow of another figure. Their face is tilted up catching the light from the ceiling. They are wearing a black top, pants and shoes. The top is long and reads CALIF.

Melisse stands in front of a white wall with their arms crossed holding their elbow and arm. Their body casts a light shadow behind them, and overlaps with the shadow of another figure. Their face is tilted up catching the light from the ceiling. They are wearing a black top, pants and shoes. The top is long and reads CALIF.

Melisse Watson

Melisse is an activist, earthworker and multidisciplinary artist, utilizing performance, visual, aural and installation art to provoke socio-political change and thriving imagined futures for Black and Indigenous bodies.

Melisse wrote, directed and performed in their award-winning show I Was Born White at the Toronto Fringe Festival in 2014. Melisse has also performed in the Summerworks Festival and the Rhubarb Festival. Melisse has presented solo and collaborative visual and performance work at The ARt Gallery of Ontario, The National Arts Centre, The Theatre Centre, The Drake Hotel, Harbourfront Centre, Daniel Spectrum, Buddies In Bad Times Theatre and at Pride Toronto.

 

 


 

About Tangled Art + Disability:
Tangled Art + Disability is a non-profit organization dedicated to developing disability arts in Canada by supporting Mad, Deaf and disability creative practices, engaging public programming and exhibitions. In April of this 2016, Tangled opened Toronto’s first art gallery dedicated to showcasing disability art and advancing accessible curatorial practices.Tangled is changing the ways people experience art.www.tangledarts.org

The Flesh of the World

The Flesh of the World promo poster

The Doris McCarthy Gallery and the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery/University of Toronto Art Centre present:

The Flesh of the World
Curated by Amanda Cachia

Featuring work by: Katherine Araniello, Ingrid Bachmann, Mowry Baden, Louise Bourgeois, Lisa Bufano and Jason Tschantré, Raphaëlle de Groot, Arseli Dokumaci, Helen Dowling, Lindsay Fisher, Erin Gee, Ann Hamilton, Sara Hendren, Wendy Jacob, Martin Kersels, Noemi Lakmaier, Tim Lee, Darrin Martin, Bruce Nauman, Carmen Papalia, Catherine Richards, Stelarc, Aaron Williamson, Alexa Wright, and Artur Zmijewski

Exhibition website: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/dmg/fleshoftheworld

Inspired by the 2015 XVII Pan American and Parapan American Games and the work of the philosopher of phenomenology, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, The Flesh of the World is an exhibition presenting diverse and complex views of the body that might deepen qualities typically associated with competitive sports and games, such as the relationship between the body and technology, and how the senses might offer new forms of knowledge to corporeal performance and potential. The Flesh of the World will push the limits of the body and challenge dominant culture’s understanding of normativity and embodiment through work by Canadian and international artists who use the body as a medium.

The artists critically inquire and experiment with the shape and forms of bodies, proving that, within the context of both the exhibition and the field of athleticism itself, the body is unfixed and indeterminate. The exhibition also makes important connections between the language of complex embodiment and the language of sports, given that many of the issues relating to endurance, physical limits, failure, pathos, and the human psyche, inform both these fields. It is within the confluence of these two worlds, sometimes playful, sometimes reflective, that we can radically expand our ideas of the corporeal apparatus as a whole. The works span across various media, including film and video installation, sculptures, framed photographs, drawings, paintings and several performances. The exhibition aims to emphasize how visitors might engage with this work across multi-disciplinary, multi-modal platforms. Just like the Pan Am and Parapan Am Games itself, this project offers up the artists’ work to the audience through a wider fulcrum of knowing the contours of our flesh.

Public Programming:

Erin Gee, What can a Vocaloid do?
Performance and Discussion with Sandra Annett: Friday June 12, 6:30pm
Trinity Square Video | 401 Richmond St W, Suite 376
Co-presentation of Trinity Square Video, Doris McCarthy Gallery, and Justina M. Barnicke/University of Toronto Art Centre

Raphaëlle de Groot, Untitled
Performance: Thursday June 25 & Friday June 26, 12:00 – 5:00pm
Justina M. Barnicke Gallery

Artist Talk with Martin Kersels (with ASL interpretation)
Thursday June 25, 5:30pm
University of Toronto Art Centre

Catherine Richards, Shroud Chrysalis I
Performance: Every Tuesday through August 25, 12:30 – 1:30pm
University of Toronto Art Centre

Accessibility:

In an effort to enable the greatest access possible for visitors, specific accommodations have been made in all areas of the exhibition. The Flesh of the World is installed in consultation with exhibition accessibility standards set forth by the Smithsonian Museum in Washington D.C. The height of most works and mounts reflects these standards. The galleries and events are in barrier-free locations. Interpretive texts will be available in large type and braille. Additionally, there will be ASL interpreters at selected public programs.

For more information please visit the exhibition website: www.utsc.utoronto.ca/dmg/fleshoftheworld

For any other accessibility arrangements or questions about accessibility, please contact Rebecca Gimmi, rebecca.gimmi@utoronto.ca, (416) 978-8463

The Transformative Experience of Falling in by sab meynert

The Transformative Experience of Falling in

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION: Over the course of 3 years sab’s sketchbook was an intimate exhalation of diaristic navigation, and it is through the vulnerability allowed in a closed-circuit space like a sketchbook, where one can truly be contained and mapped out for all nuances. Approximately 30 drawings chosen from various sketchbooks, document the process of becoming and unbecoming as it relates the instability of mental health when moving through various stages in life. When the viewer encounters these maps of space created to communicate vulnerability, resilience and movement beyond, they are invited to occupy and reinterpret it as needed. This is an intimate display to create an empathetic connection with the intention of healing, to provide visual space of refuge and restitution, away from a place of pain, something new altogether rather than a reaction alone. In showcasing the process of navigation one is also able to see themselves, to allow the process to change oneself rather than whether the aspirational goal is ever met.

The show will feature sculptural work that acts as private anchor points, and two new works that were drawn as a result of this inner work, that have not yet been publicized anywhere, as a tone to set for the unfolding that happens once the process has reached a pressure point in trajectory.

All events associated with this exhibit will be barrier-free and will have ASL interpretation. We request that you help us make this event scent-free. This is a FREE event.

The artist thanks the Ontario Arts Council for generously supporting this work.

DIRECTIONS: Tangled Vitrines are located outside studio 30 on the basement level of the 401 Richmond Building. The accessible subway stations are at Union Station and Spadina Station. 401 Richmond can also be accessed by Streetcar by taking the 510 Spadina streetcar from Spadina subway station or the 510 Richmond Street stop going north from Union Station, which is intermittently accessible.

CONTACT:
info@tangledarts.org
647 725 5064
www.tangledarts.org
Tangled Art Gallery (TAG) is dedicated to exhibiting disability art and showcasing the highest standard of accessible curatorial practice.

Own Your Cervix

Own Your Cervix promo poster

Own Your Cervix by Vanessa Dion Fletcher is an interactive installation that uses menstrual blood to physically and metaphorically create a gendered space reflecting on what defines our bodies. In this boundary-pushing show, Dion-Fletcher uses installation and performance to invite us all to think about how our bodies, and the ways we think about our bodies are marked and defined, challenging a medical or anthropological lens.

Textiles, pattern and the athletics of beauty become the backdrop for self-examination in the context of a feminist decolonial discourse.

As part of the exhibition, audiences will be invited to participate in private self-examination sessions, guided by the artist. All persons with or without a cervix are welcome to participate. Materials and instruction will be provided in the privacy of a 30-minute individual appointment.

Accessibility:
This exhibition features audio description for all works and will also have multiple tactile pieces. All events associated with this exhibit will be barrier-free and will have ASL interpretation. We request that you help us make this event scent-free. This is a FREE event.

Directions:
Tangled Art Gallery is located in studio 122 on the main floor of the 401 Richmond Building. The accessible subway stations are at Union Station and Spadina Station. 401 Richmond can also be accessed by Streetcar by taking the 510 Spadina streetcar from Spadina subway station or the 510 Richmond Street stop going north from Union Station, which is intermittently accessible.

Instagram: @tangled_arts
Twitter: @TangledArtsTO
Facebook: @tangledartanddisability

Contact:
info@tangledarts.org
647 725 5064
www.tangledarts.org
Tangled Art Gallery (TAG) is dedicated to exhibiting disability art and showcasing the hi