Event Category: Exhibition

Ancestral Mindscapes

A person floating on their back in greenish water by a long narrow rocky outcropping

Ancestral Mindscapes is an autobiographical collaboration using video, sound and photography to explore the intersection of madness, indigeneity, colonialism, environmental destruction and the healing power of nature.

Ancestral Mindscapes is a collaboration between Rick Miller, who self-identifies as a Mad artist in discovery of his Indigenous ancestry; Jules Koostachin, a Cree artist and academic; and Geneviève Thibault, a Gaspésienne photographer and videographer.

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Vanessa Dion Fletcher: Curiosity and Quillwork

A microscopic image of porcupine quills, repeated and inverted to make a pattern.

Vanessa Dion Fletcher’s solo exhibition Curiosity and Quillwork demonstrates an appreciation for repetition and pattern-making using and diverging from traditional quillwork forms. As a mode of working through complicated limitations of colonial impacts, on language and limited access to traditional Indigenous knowledge. Dion Fletcher interacts with visual and creative means as a way of connecting to her ancestral relations and reclaiming her culture. The exhibition features three new works: Zigzag in twenty-nine parts (2019), a series of works on paper; Shifting Focus (2019), a microscopic digital video; and Advancing Colors (2019) a delicate installation of an ornate pattern that emulates the traditional practice of birch bark quillwork.

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Walkabout Tour with David Bobier: Hands On!

A row of cymbals suspended by cables along a brick wall in a large open room

Guest curator David Bobier leads an all-ages sensory tour of the vibrotactile art featured in new exhibit, VibraFusionLab: Bridging Practices in Accessibility, Art and Communications.

About the exhibit: Experience sound and vibration technologies through art installations by David Bobier, Lindsay Fisher, Marla Hlady, Ellen Moffat, Gordon Monahan, Alison O’Daniel, and Lynx Sainte-Marie. By making sound tangible through touch, this exhibition aims to change public perceptions of difference and disability.

Presented in partnership with VibraFusionLab, an innovative centre for vibrotactile research and creative practice based in London, Ontario.

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Processing by Aiden Lee

A piece of fabric with drapes and folds, with multicoloured paint markings on it

My name is Aiden Lee. I am 15 years old, and I was born with Autism, ADHD and anxiety. This does not define me but instead adds colour to my already chromatic world. I am an artist. I use mixed mediums to unleash my world on those who visually consume my work from my side of the spectrum.

For many people processing is simple, but for a person with a disability, this can be very different. How do I digest the information and when the idea is fully formed in my brain? Is it as clear as it was intended?

Take a walk through the different levels and stages, become an idea and travel your way through my brain and see what you become on the other side.

I invite you to start…PROCESSING.

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Unexpected Movements: A Symposium for Automatisme Ambulatoire

Still from tributary, 2019 by Claire Cunningham.

This one-day symposium features curator Amanda Cachia along with four Disability Studies scholars from Canada and the United States discussing their work in the context of the exhibition Automatisme Ambulatoire: Hysteria, Imitation, Performance. Recognizing that our society imposes certain norms and expectations on bodies, language, and movement, this symposium explores ways to challenge, question, and undermine such norms as a means of welcoming the unexpected and reclaiming space for all bodies.

Organized in partnership by Jane Dryden, Department of Philosophy, the Owens Art Gallery and the Centre for Canadian Studies, Mount Allison University.

Presenters include Amanda Cachia, Eliza Chandler, Kelly Fritsch, Alyson Patsavas, Joshua St. Pierre

Registration Deadline: 1 September 2019
All events and meals are free, but registration is required.
More information on the Automatisme Ambulatoire website
Registration Form: https://forms.gle/TMbXystLPf5mxumY6

Vernissage: Automatisme Ambulatoire: Hysteria, Imitation, Performance

Video still from Gems and Minerals, 2018 by Diane Borsato.

Vernissage for the opening of the exhibition Automatisme Ambulatoire: Hysteria, Imitation, Performance, curated by Amanda Cachia

Works by Diane Borsato, Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz, Claire Cunningham, Brendan Fernandes, Every Ocean Hughes, My Barbarian

“Automatisme ambulatoire,” or ambulatory automatism, is an expression that conjures notions of the compulsive traveler, while simultaneously implying irresistible urges and movements, such as grimaces, tics, and gestures, often linked to physical pathologies. The artists in this exhibition were invited to consider such gestures as a performative style, one that might work to subvert, undo, transform and reimagine the body and language, both real and imagined. Featuring six new works commissioned specifically for this project, the exhibition aims to question, challenge, and complicate the ethical and moral boundaries of “imitation” and how the so-called “pathologized” body might be considered in new, contemporary social and cultural contexts.

More info at: automatismeambulatoire.ca
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Automatisme Ambulatoire: Hysteria, Imitation, Performance

Video still from Gems and Minerals, 2018 by Diane Borsato.

Curated by Amanda Cachia

Works by Diane Borsato, Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz, Claire Cunningham, Brendan Fernandes, Every Ocean Hughes, My Barbarian

“Automatisme ambulatoire,” or ambulatory automatism, is an expression that conjures notions of the compulsive traveler, while simultaneously implying irresistible urges and movements, such as grimaces, tics, and gestures, often linked to physical pathologies. The artists in this exhibition were invited to consider such gestures as a performative style, one that might work to subvert, undo, transform and reimagine the body and language, both real and imagined. Featuring six new works commissioned specifically for this project, the exhibition aims to question, challenge, and complicate the ethical and moral boundaries of “imitation” and how the so-called “pathologized” body might be considered in new, contemporary social and cultural contexts.

More info at: automatismeambulatoire.ca

A distinct aggregation / A dynamic equivalent / A generous ethic of invention: Six writers respond to six sculptures

A text drawing that reads “Of all possibilities, this one here, now.” It's white on a muted blue-green background.

A project by Aislinn Thomas with Anna Bowen, Angela Marie Schenstead, Crystal Mowry, Laura Burke, Catherine Frazee, Nicole Kelly Westman, and Shannon Finnegan.

This commissioned work is available in two formats: as a sound-work available to sign out from the Walter Phillips Gallery front desk or streamed via the embedded SoundCloud widget; as well as through a broadsheet featuring audio transcriptions of each response as well as text drawings from the collaborative series, “A seat at the table, a slice of the pie”, the result of a dialogue between Aislinn Thomas and Shannon Finnegan about the practice of visual description.

A distinct aggregation / A dynamic equivalent / A generous ethic of invention on the Banff Centre website

Take 2: 2019 Members’ Show

Promotional image for Take 2: 2019 Members' Show by Arts AccessAbility Network Manitoba, in white on a dark purple background with orange, pink and blue accents

Arts AccessAbility Network Manitoba is proud to present their second annual members show Take 2. The 20 artists with disabilities in this exhibition represent 10% of our members. Our membership consists of both artists with disabilities and supporters/stakeholders of the organization. AANM facilitates a network to support artists with disabilities in achieving individual artistic excellence, promotes higher visibility of these artists within all disciplines and advocates for policies and practices intended to make the arts more accessible to all Manitobans.

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This year we asked our visual artists to create work with the theme of Take 2. Some artists interpreted the theme as double or repeated images with minor differences which changed the imagery completely. For example, Alice Crawford describes her work as “two images printed from the same two plates; one image had one plate printed upside down. When information is misheard, images are interpreted differently”. By flipping the plate, a whole new image is created during the second printing.

Other artists used the theme of Take 2 as an opportunity to try a new art practice. Margaret Switala states “recently, I have been doing abstract paintings which are a big departure from my surrealism art that I have done in the past”. Miranda Kudajczyk also used this opportunity to try new artforms stating “this allowed me to experiment the textures, the different styles of art and the ink colours”.

Whichever way the theme was interpreted, the meaning of Take 2 was unique for each artist, creating a diverse and thought-provoking exhibition.