Event Category: Opening

Layers

Promo image for "Cool Arts presents Layers" with white text over a background of a painting in reds, blues and yellows

The FINA Art Gallery (1148 Research Road, UBCO) will host the third annual exhibition in partnership with Cool Arts Society in their gallery space this fall. The exhibition, Layers, will run from September 30 thru to October 11 with an opening reception held in the same space on October 4 from 3:30pm to 4:30pm. The exhibition and reception are free of charge to attend and will celebrate work by adult artists living with developmental disabilities in the Central Okanagan.

Layers aims to introduce more disability and outsider art to the general public. Though there are many gifted animators, sculptors, and fibre artists living with disabilities in the Okanagan, too often their work is considered amateur or unprofessional. With the increased popularity of the disability and outsider art movements around the world, Layers attempts to bring more visibility to the work created by artists who have traditionally been on the fringes of the art world. All work is representative of each individual artist, with video animations, wall hangings, and yarn-bombed furniture featured in the exhibition.

More information

O is for Orange

Fresh and dried oranges on a table beside two puzzle pieces; one is orange with a yellow O and the other reads "O is for orange" with an illustration orange with branch

‘O is for Orange’ showcases a collaborative meditation on the skin of the fruit body, through the act of peeling. To contemplate the aspect of touch in care work, the multiethnic orange body is chosen for how it gets held and peeled. For how its shape reminds the hands to create for it an enclosure, a coop. The relationship between the hands and the orange then forms a skin to skin relationship.

Now, there isn’t a hierarchy when we speak of touch, but perhaps one does emerge when we hold. Is the skin the protector or are the hands, as they unravel it? A group of care-workers and parents lend their voices and perspectives on care, comfort and control.

*An art & social practice initiative, in collaboration with posAbilities.

More information on Facebook

2019 National Awards Ceremony

Black and white image of mosaic work in progress of a snarling tiger

Join JRG Society for the Arts at our National Awards Ceremony. We will present the 2019 Emerging Artist Grant and the 2019 Atlantic Filmmaker Award. Refreshments, art exhibit, live music & door prizes.

This is a free event! Everyone is welcome! Join us in supporting artists with disabilities.

More information on Facebook

Image: Mosaic work in progress by 2018 JRG grant winner Wy Joung Kou.

Opening Party: New Fall Exhibitions

Olivia Johnston, Madonna (Roger) [detail], 2019, digital photograph

Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) will host a party to celebrate the opening of its four new fall exhibitions. CUAG’s new exhibitions are: Rah: SuperNova; Olivia Johnston: Saints and Madonnas; Sites of Memory: Legacies of the Japanese Canadian Internment; and Inheriting Redress: The Japanese Community Association Archive.

At 3:00 PM, opening remarks will be offered by Carleton President Benoit-Antoine Bacon and His Excellency Kimihiro Ishikane, ambassador of Japan to Canada. An exciting collaborative performance by Bear Nation Drummers and Oto-Wa Taiko will follow.

More information on Facebook

Rah: SuperNova (Sept. 15 to Dec. 8, curated by Heather Anderson)
SuperNova is a video installation that presents a futuristic talent show in an intergalactic realm. The artist appears in the guise of seven different characters, including Oreo, Fatimeh and Coco, whose talent show entries playfully explore issues of race and ethnic performance.

Olivia Johnston: Saints and Madonnas (Sept. 15 to Dec. 8, curated by Heather Anderson)
The Ottawa artist and recent winner of the RBC Emerging Artist Award continues her investigation of Christianity’s influence on art and society with a new series of photographic portraits of her contemporaries, posed and dressed as biblical figures.

Sites of Memory: Legacies of the Japanese Canadian Internment (Sept.15, 2019 to Jan. 26, 2020, curated by Emily Putnam)
The histories, legacies and impact of the Canadian government’s internment of Japanese Canadians during the Second World War are powerfully considered in video, installation and works on paper by three contemporary artists of Japanese-Canadian ancestry—Cindy Mochizuki (Vancouver), Emma Nishimura (Toronto) and senior Ottawa artist Norman Takeuchi.

Inheriting Redress: The Ottawa Japanese Community Association Archive (Sept. 15, 2019 to Jan. 26 2020, curated by Emily Putnam and Rebecca Dolgoy)
In April 1988, Japanese Canadians marched on Parliament Hill to pressure the Government of Canada to formally acknowledge and offer compensation for their dispossession and internment during the Second World War. This exhibition surveys the redress campaign’s visual culture and illuminates its history, telling stories through objects loaned by the Ottawa Japanese Community Association and activists involved in the landmark effort.

Sites of Memory and Inheriting Redress are organized with the support of Ottawa Japanese Community Association, the Ottawa Japanese Cultural Centre and the Embassy of Japan in Canada.

No More Than Your Shoulders Can Handle

A painting with geometric shapes by Gloria C. Swain

Gloria C. Swain is multidisciplinary Black female artist, social justice activist, researcher, seniors right advocate, and writer. Gloria works within the mediums of installation, painting, performance, and photography to challenge systemic oppression against Black women and trans folks.

More information on Facebook

Black Artist’ Network in Dialogue (BAND) is dedicated to supporting, documenting and showcasing the artistic and cultural contributions of Black artists and cultural workers in Canada and internationally.

Ancestral Mindscapes

A person floating on their back in greenish water by a long narrow rocky outcropping

Ancestral Mindscapes is an autobiographical collaboration using video, sound and photography to explore the intersection of madness, indigeneity, colonialism, environmental destruction and the healing power of nature.

Ancestral Mindscapes is a collaboration between Rick Miller, who self-identifies as a Mad artist in discovery of his Indigenous ancestry; Jules Koostachin, a Cree artist and academic; and Geneviève Thibault, a Gaspésienne photographer and videographer.

More information
Ancestral Mindscapes on Facebook

Vernissage: Automatisme Ambulatoire: Hysteria, Imitation, Performance

Video still from Gems and Minerals, 2018 by Diane Borsato.

Vernissage for the opening of the exhibition Automatisme Ambulatoire: Hysteria, Imitation, Performance, curated by Amanda Cachia

Works by Diane Borsato, Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz, Claire Cunningham, Brendan Fernandes, Every Ocean Hughes, My Barbarian

“Automatisme ambulatoire,” or ambulatory automatism, is an expression that conjures notions of the compulsive traveler, while simultaneously implying irresistible urges and movements, such as grimaces, tics, and gestures, often linked to physical pathologies. The artists in this exhibition were invited to consider such gestures as a performative style, one that might work to subvert, undo, transform and reimagine the body and language, both real and imagined. Featuring six new works commissioned specifically for this project, the exhibition aims to question, challenge, and complicate the ethical and moral boundaries of “imitation” and how the so-called “pathologized” body might be considered in new, contemporary social and cultural contexts.

More info at: automatismeambulatoire.ca
More information on Facebook

My Pixel is Expanding – Ottawa

A geometric shape filled with intricate and colourful hand drawn grids

Please join us to celebrate the work of artist Hyun-Woo “Pixel” Kim, a celebrated Korean artist with Down syndrome. In this first Canadian tour of his work, ‘My Pixel is Expanding” explores the ways we interpret math, science, and geometry.

The artist will be in attendance and light refreshments will be provided and all are warmly welcomed.

More information on the Indefinite Arts Centre website

Pixel Kim is an artist with Down syndrome, expressing his interests in science, math, and geometry through art work that takes on various different forms within the visual arts. His works have been celebrated throughout various galleries and art institutions throughout Korea. By bring Pixel and his works to Canada, we hope that this can inspire others throughout the country to realize that the artistic creativity of individuals living with developmental disabilities should indeed be celebrated and supported – and that by finding the right medium like Pixel has, countless other artists can also walk in his footsteps and find support and integration into the mainstream arts world.

My Pixel is Expanding – Toronto

A geometric shape filled with intricate and colourful hand drawn grids

Reception
Please join us to celebrate the work of artist Hyun-Woo “Pixel” Kim, a celebrated Korean artist with Down syndrome. In this first Canadian tour of his work, ‘My Pixel is Expanding” explores the ways we interpret math, science, and geometry.

The artist will be in attendance and light refreshments will be provided and all are warmly welcomed.

Workshop
On Saturday August 24 Pixel will be hosting a free workshop, exploring some of his artistic practice. No prior experience is necessary to join, and individuals of all abilities are warmly welcomed to join. All materials will be provided. To register please email Vanessa.Toews@ouriac.ca as space is limited.

More information on the Indefinite Arts Centre website

Pixel Kim is an artist with Down syndrome, expressing his interests in science, math, and geometry through art work that takes on various different forms within the visual arts. His works have been celebrated throughout various galleries and art institutions throughout Korea. By bring Pixel and his works to Canada, we hope that this can inspire others throughout the country to realize that the artistic creativity of individuals living with developmental disabilities should indeed be celebrated and supported – and that by finding the right medium like Pixel has, countless other artists can also walk in his footsteps and find support and integration into the mainstream arts world.