Event Category: Screening

Charm City

A Baltimore police officer standing by an open car door and holding a radio

With a deep rooted history of economic instability, racism and segregation, Baltimore has been plagued by high homicide rates, police brutality and gang violence. The discriminatory laws and escalating street violence has aggravated the animosity between Baltimore’s citizens and police, inflicting further violence upon an already vulnerable community. In Charm City, Marilyn Ness offers an exhaustive and nuanced portrait of the city’s residents, police officers, social workers and government officials. Capturing her subjects’ day-to-day activities, Ness explores the complex relationship between Baltimore’s law enforcement and its residents, showing a fervent collective effort to break the vicious circle of violence. Visually striking and emotionally stirring, Charm City proves change is difficult; yet possible.

More information and tickets

Screening with:

Broken Windows: In post-Ferguson St. Louis, angry protests erupt after the acquittal of a white policeman in the fatal shooting of a black man. In the wake of the protests, artists come together to help a St. Louis community heal.

A Year of Hope

A child standing on a beach in front of a breaking wave - their footprints are visible in the sand

Graphic, shocking and eye-opening, A Year of Hope is a cinematic guide into the world of Manila’s street youth. Mikala Krogh follows 20 children during their one year stay at Stairway Center – a local charity that provides street children of Manila with shelter, food and schooling for 12 months. The Stairway social workers focus on helping youth recover from the sexual abuse and trauma they experienced while living on the streets. Simultaneously, Krogh films police cadets being trained on child sexual abuse at the National Police Training Institute. Juxtaposing children’s personal stories with the footage from the police training, Krogh punctures the social stigma around sexual violence that makes Manila’s children easy targets for sexual predators. Capturing the chilling realities of the city’s impoverished youth, A Year of Hope gives survivors a way to express themselves and be heard, showing hope in the darkest corners of Philippines’ capital.

More information and tickets

Screening with Your Mother is a Thief, an animated film on the psychological violence of parental alienation. Language: no dialogue.

Shorts Screening Series

A black and white photo of a woman sitting in a dimly lit bus. The reflection of her face is half visible in the window

Please note that this event is a part of the Opening Night Reception and is only accessible with a ticket to TransMilitary, the Opening Night Film.

More information on the Human Rights Film Festival website

Films

How to Disarm a Fighter Jet: Early one January in 2017 a priest and a quaker activist were discovered midway through a break-in at an airbase in the north of England. Their plan was to destroy British made fighter jets bound for the war in Yemen. These jets were part of a multibillion pound weapons deal with Saudi Arabia: a deal that politicians, legal experts and NGOs have deemed illegal. Charged with criminal damage, the pair gambled their liberty for a chance to put the arms trade on trial.

Over the Wall: A coincidental meeting between two kids from both sides of the separation wall catches them by surprise, as they learn that reality is different than what they’ve been told.

We the Children: We the Children is a short documentary about childrens’ thoughts and feelings on politics. Sparked by the 2016 elections results, we witness how a group of children, ages 7 to 11, at a democratic school in Harlem, New York City, responds to their concern about the direction their country might take as a result of Donald Trump elected as president. Through an ongoing journey that involves their own civic law education, community involvement, and activism, they ultimately question the general perception of children’ s limited role in politics and open the door for further discussion.

Timbó: Construction of dams by energy companies in the Brazilian Amazon would destroy the heart of the world’s largest rainforest, and severely affect the community of the indigenous people in the area. If built, the dams would flood an area the size of London, Paris and Amsterdam combined. The flood would also cause a large amount of toxic plants to dissolve in the water, leading to severe poisoning or even death among the local tribes. These plants are commonly known as Timbó.

Gaze: On her way back from work a woman witnesses something happening in the bus and she has to decide if she reveals it or not.

TransMilitary

A person running on a gravel road through a wooded area, with a black t-shirt and shorts, with Army in yellow letters

Based on outdated and discriminatory medical policies dating back to World War II, transgender people were banned from serving in the US military until July 2016. While an estimated 15,500 transgender people serve in the U.S. armed forces, transgender service members have had to conceal their identities due to the military gender-based restrictions. TransMilitary follows Senior Airman Logan Ireland, Corporal Laila Villanueva, Captain Jennifer Peace and First Lieutenant El Cook as they work together to repeal the ban on transgender troops. Putting their careers and families on the line, they fearlessly confront the top brass Pentagon officials, demanding justice and inclusive policies. While they succeeded to lift the ban in 2016, the Trump administration continuously attempts to block transgender people from serving. In the midst of Trump’s effort to erase transgender rights, TransMilitary is a powerful reminder of the resilience and perseverance of the US transgender troops and transgender community at large.

Ticket also includes access to the Opening Night Reception + Shorts Screening Series.

More information and tickets

BAFF’s Beyond Barriers: Shorts Screening

A black and white photo of a smiling person seated in front of a white wall, looking to the right of the frame

A free event screening a series of curated, local and international short films, made by or featuring people living with disabilities. This event is held in partnership with Halifax Public Libraries.

More information on the BAFF website

Films

Transform: Transform is a short autobiographical documentary which explores individuals living with the repercussions of spinal injuries. Through their journey of grief and resiliency, we uncover how similar incidents can have different outcomes and that one injury can leave you stronger than ever before.

La Lluvia Habla (The Rain Talks): A filmmaker explores the challenges that Latinas face from within their own families and the larger hispanic community when talking about mental health issues like depression and anxiety.

The Day I Stopped Talking: The Day I Stopped Talking animates a poem by the same name which describes the poet/filmmaker’s early life experiences with depression and psychosis. Poet, novelist and filmmaker Anna Quon is a mixed race, middle-aged, mobility-challenged Mad woman who has lived mostly in Dartmouth and Halifax since the day she was born.

A Cochlear Implant: A short infographic about how a Cochlear Implant works.

Overcome: The life of a man who tragically lost his vision at a young age, but through it all kept pushing towards finding joy in life again. A documentary about the inspiring story of Chris Delaney, a man who overcame disability to achieve his dreams after accumulative head trauma left him partially blind in the prime of his life.

A Real Boy: A 24-year old who suffers from autism shares his perspective on life and his struggles. His mother tells stories about his struggles and what it’s like to have an autistic son.

Twice Exceptional: Samuel Faux joined YDA as one of our youngest students, having recently finished 9th grade at Woodland Park Middle School. His interest in the program stems from wanting to tell his own story of growing up with Apraxia of Speech. In addition, Samuel excels above most of his peers in math, creating a simultaneous diagnosis of TWICE EXCEPTIONAL. The result is the film by the same name, a personal account of one family’s coming to terms with a less known condition and navigating doctors and speech therapists while finding strength in overcoming and attaining acceptance of one’s full exceptional self.

Asher – A Therapeutic Family Dog: Asher, a seven year old border collie lives with Harriet’s parents, Sandra Haycock and Angus Johnston. Sandra has been living with Multiple Sclerosis for almost thirty years and Angus deals with arthritis and has trouble with his mobility. He is not a registered therapy dog, however he has clearly become an incredibly valuable member of the family.

Under The Weather: When shifts in a young woman’s mental health come to life as shifts in the weather, she struggles to enjoy a “sunny picnic” with her oblivious boyfriend.

1 Billion: There are 1 Billion people with a disability in the world. Yet with so many people with disabilities, one would imagine they are accepted as part of society, have equal opportunities to education and work – however, in this short documentary film, we learn that people with disabilities are less than second class citizens. Statistics show that people with disabilities are still struggling to be recognised as equals, with many demonstrating their ‘ability’ to make a significant contribution to the broader community, just like everyone else.

Mumpsimus and Halcyon Discord: If you are a young person experiencing mental ill health and homelessness, life is far from a walk in the park. This film explores the connections between mental health and homelessness, challenging common misrepresentations in the media. Using the medium of the spoken word, the film questions whether we can ever view issues such as these in an objective way.

BAFF’s Beyond Barriers: Shorts Screening

A close up photo of a tassle with multicoloured fringe in cream, pink and brown

A free event screening a series of curated, local and international short films, made by or featuring people living with disabilities. This event is held in partnership with Halifax Public Libraries.

More information on the BAFF website

Films

Fabulous Fringes: A poem by Leah Kelley brought to life.

Rolling Without Fear: Fear is something that may stop people from achieving their goals. However, for Thiruvarangan Thirunimalan, despite his disability he continues to overcome obstacles and live his travel dream.

Wavy Head: At 9 months old, a team of surgeons cut open my skull, removed my face, put my eyes on a table, reshaped my head. Wavy Head isn’t about a rare birth defect or even about an operation that might have killed me: Wavy Head is about grappling with self image and personal uniqueness, an honest account of a widespread journey.

Same Nightmare: A young disabled teenager entering high school finds himself working towards gaining a better life for himself while also altering the perceptions of the people around him regarding their views of people with disabilities.

Sincerely Anthony: Everyone deals with the suicide of a friend differently. We grew up together, and one day, he was gone, leaving no letter, no explanation, nothing behind. This film was an exploration of the acceptance of a best friend’s death through an imagined letter left behind.

Perfect Brothers: Harry was born with a facial disfigurement due to a condition called “Goldenhar syndrome”. He is one of twins and this follows the story of the close bond with his brother Oliver. After many operations to improve Harrys appearance he still gets a lot of negative attention but ultimately, he is a happy child.

My Name is Leo: A day in the life of a very special little boy called Leo.

Art of the Morning: A lyrical look at how one person prepares for the day ahead, savouring each moment.

Just go!: Inspired by the incredible true story about a young man JUST, who lost both of his legs in a childhood accident and who is in love with the girl next door – IEVA. The story begins when JUST meets IEVA on the doorstep of the house they both live in. They start a flirty conversation that is interrupted by two thieves, who rob IEVA in front of JUST. In the blink of an eye JUST decides to follow the thieves to retrieve IEVA’S bag and conquer her heart.

KYRA: A vitiligo model inspiring people to not to be afraid of their own appearance.

Swim Bike Run: Attracted to water from an early age, 15 year old, autistic, James Carson has learnt to run, swim and cycle to compete in triathlons.

BAFF’s Beyond Barriers: Shorts Screening

A person using a red mobility scooter on a snowy sidewalk, with a black and white border collie riding on one side of the scooter

A free event screening a series of curated, local and international short films, made by or featuring people living with disabilities. This screening is rated PG for minor language. This event is held in partnership with Halifax Public Libraries.

More information on the BAFF website

Films

Transform: Transform is a short autobiographical documentary which explores individuals living with the repercussions of spinal injuries. Through their journey of grief and resiliency, we uncover how similar incidents can have different outcomes and that one injury can leave you stronger than ever before.

La Lluvia Habla (The Rain Talks): A filmmaker explores the challenges that Latinas face from within their own families and the larger hispanic community when talking about mental health issues like depression and anxiety.

The Day I Stopped Talking: The Day I Stopped Talking animates a poem by the same name which describes the poet/filmmaker’s early life experiences with depression and psychosis. Poet, novelist and filmmaker Anna Quon is a mixed race, middle-aged, mobility-challenged Mad woman who has lived mostly in Dartmouth and Halifax since the day she was born.

A Cochlear Implant: A short infographic about how a Cochlear Implant works.

Overcome: The life of a man who tragically lost his vision at a young age, but through it all kept pushing towards finding joy in life again. A documentary about the inspiring story of Chris Delaney, a man who overcame disability to achieve his dreams after accumulative head trauma left him partially blind in the prime of his life.

A Real Boy: A 24-year old who suffers from autism shares his perspective on life and his struggles. His mother tells stories about his struggles and what it’s like to have an autistic son.

Twice Exceptional: Samuel Faux joined YDA as one of our youngest students, having recently finished 9th grade at Woodland Park Middle School. His interest in the program stems from wanting to tell his own story of growing up with Apraxia of Speech. In addition, Samuel excels above most of his peers in math, creating a simultaneous diagnosis of TWICE EXCEPTIONAL. The result is the film by the same name, a personal account of one family’s coming to terms with a less known condition and navigating doctors and speech therapists while finding strength in overcoming and attaining acceptance of one’s full exceptional self.

Asher – A Therapeutic Family Dog: Asher, a seven year old border collie lives with Harriet’s parents, Sandra Haycock and Angus Johnston. Sandra has been living with Multiple Sclerosis for almost thirty years and Angus deals with arthritis and has trouble with his mobility. He is not a registered therapy dog, however he has clearly become an incredibly valuable member of the family.

Under The Weather: When shifts in a young woman’s mental health come to life as shifts in the weather, she struggles to enjoy a “sunny picnic” with her oblivious boyfriend.

1 Billion: There are 1 Billion people with a disability in the world. Yet with so many people with disabilities, one would imagine they are accepted as part of society, have equal opportunities to education and work – however, in this short documentary film, we learn that people with disabilities are less than second class citizens. Statistics show that people with disabilities are still struggling to be recognised as equals, with many demonstrating their ‘ability’ to make a significant contribution to the broader community, just like everyone else.

“Singing to Myself” Feature Film + Q&A

A person sitting in a field in front of a weathered shed and a dilapidated fenced enclosure, against a backdrop of a blue sky with clouds

Debt. Underemployment. Awkward relationships. Singing to Myself, a 2016 Atlantic Film Festival selection, tells the story of a young deaf woman living in Prince Edward Island and the precocious musician who comes into her life.

Attend this free screening of Singing to Myself, written and directed by Harmony Wagner and starring Sophie MacLean, Heidi Grant and Andrew Murray.

There will be popcorn, refreshments and a brief post-screening Q&A with writer-director Harmony Wagner and Accessible Media Inc. described video specialist Simone Cupid, moderated by AMI Accessibility Officer Chris O’Brien.

This event is presented in partnership with Accessible Media Inc.

More information on the BAFF website

BAFF’s Beyond Barriers: Shorts Screening

A line drawing in white on a black background of a figure in the middle of a circle of arms and hands with pointed fingers

A free event screening a series of curated, local and international short films, made by or featuring people living with disabilities.

More information on the BAFF website

Films

Fabulous Fringes: A poem by Leah Kelley brought to life.

Rolling Without Fear: Fear is something that may stop people from achieving their goals. However, for Thiruvarangan Thirunimalan, despite his disability he continues to overcome obstacles and live his travel dream.

Wavy Head: At 9 months old, a team of surgeons cut open my skull, removed my face, put my eyes on a table, reshaped my head. Wavy Head isn’t about a rare birth defect or even about an operation that might have killed me: Wavy Head is about grappling with self image and personal uniqueness, an honest account of a widespread journey.

Same Nightmare: A young disabled teenager entering high school finds himself working towards gaining a better life for himself while also altering the perceptions of the people around him regarding their views of people with disabilities.

Sincerely Anthony: Everyone deals with the suicide of a friend differently. We grew up together, and one day, he was gone, leaving no letter, no explanation, nothing behind. This film was an exploration of the acceptance of a best friend’s death through an imagined letter left behind.

Perfect Brothers: Harry was born with a facial disfigurement due to a condition called “Goldenhar syndrome”. He is one of twins and this follows the story of the close bond with his brother Oliver. After many operations to improve Harrys appearance he still gets a lot of negative attention but ultimately, he is a happy child.

My Name is Leo: A day in the life of a very special little boy called Leo.

Art of the Morning: A lyrical look at how one person prepares for the day ahead, savouring each moment.

Just go!: Inspired by the incredible true story about a young man JUST, who lost both of his legs in a childhood accident and who is in love with the girl next door – IEVA. The story begins when JUST meets IEVA on the doorstep of the house they both live in. They start a flirty conversation that is interrupted by two thieves, who rob IEVA in front of JUST. In the blink of an eye JUST decides to follow the thieves to retrieve IEVA’S bag and conquer her heart.

KYRA: A vitiligo model inspiring people to not to be afraid of their own appearance.

BAFF Roadshow – Truro

Colourful shapes resembling abstract animals on a black background, with the caption "The pictures I took were a nightmare of blunt-nosed hunger, teeth jagged as rabbit trap" superimposed in white text on black

Join us for the BAFF Roadshow in Truro, Nova Scotia for a evening of great short films!

More information about the BAFF Roadshow

Films:

Transform: Transform is a short autobiographical documentary which explores individuals living with the repercussions of spinal injuries. Through their journey of grief and resiliency, we uncover how similar incidents can have different outcomes and that one injury can leave you stronger than ever before.

La Lluvia Habla (The Rain Talks): A filmmaker explores the challenges that Latinas face from within their own families and the larger hispanic community when talking about mental health issues like depression and anxiety.

The Day I Stopped Talking: The Day I Stopped Talking animates a poem by the same name which describes the poet/filmmaker’s early life experiences with depression and psychosis. Poet, novelist and filmmaker Anna Quon is a mixed race, middle-aged, mobility-challenged Mad woman who has lived mostly in Dartmouth and Halifax since the day she was born.

Fabulous Fringes: A poem by Leah Kelley brought to life.

Rolling Without Fear: Fear is something that may stop people from achieving their goals. However, for Thiruvarangan Thirunimalan, despite his disability he continues to overcome obstacles and live his travel dream.

Wavy Head: At 9 months old, a team of surgeons cut open my skull, removed my face, put my eyes on a table, reshaped my head. Wavy Head isn’t about a rare birth defect or even about an operation that might have killed me: Wavy Head is about grappling with self image and personal uniqueness, an honest account of a widespread journey.

Same Nightmare: A young disabled teenager entering high school finds himself working towards gaining a better life for himself while also altering the perceptions of the people around him regarding their views of people with disabilities.

Perfect Brothers: Harry was born with a facial disfigurement due to a condition called “Goldenhar syndrome”. He is one of twins and this follows the story of the close bond with his brother Oliver. After many operations to improve Harrys appearance he still gets a lot of negative attention but ultimately, he is a happy child.

Asher – A Therapeutic Family Dog: Asher, a seven year old border collie lives with Harriet’s parents, Sandra Haycock and Angus Johnston. Sandra has been living with Multiple Sclerosis for almost thirty years and Angus deals with arthritis and has trouble with his mobility. He is not a registered therapy dog, however he has clearly become an incredibly valuable member of the family.